Lansdowne heritage ruling 'embarrassing' for city, group says

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Laura Mueller, www.yourottawaregion.com

GLEBE - Heritage Ottawa says the city should be embarrassed about being on the losing side of a hearing about heritage conservation at Lansdowne Park.

The heritage group objected to the city's decision to move the Hortoculture building to another location on the Lansdowne site to make way for an Empire cinema and an underground parking garage. The heritage designation on the 1914-era building had to be stripped in order to make the move possible, and that's where Heritage Ottawa drew the line.

The Ontario Conservation Review Board agreed.

During a hearing at Centrepointe Theatre from April 18 to 22, the board found that the city's case for lifting and moving the Horticulture Building is built on "transient, project specific and insufficient grounds."

Lansdowne review panel wants update

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CBC News

The group appointed to review plans to revitalize Ottawa's Lansdowne Park say they have gone six months without anything significant to review.

In a letter Tuesday to Ottawa city staff, the Lansdowne Review Panel members said they need more details of the Lansdowne plan, and more often.

Councillors David Chernushenko and Peter Hume drafted the letter with the support of the other two panelists.

"We haven't seen anything comprehensive showing us the whole site," said Chernushenko. "We need to see this, we need to understand it. So put it all together and then respond to these questions and invite us in to review it, that's what we'd like to be doing."

The city voted last June to form a public-private partnership with Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group to renovate Lansdowne Park. Under the deal, OSEG will oversee renovations of Frank Clair Stadium, and build a mix of condominium and retail space in the rest of the park.

The $300-million project has been controversial from the outset, however, with plans changing frequently.

Lansdowne deal leaves community far from happy

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CBC News

Community opponents of the redevelopment of Lansdowne Park say they agreed to a mediated settlement with the city with reluctance.

The city announced Wednesday it had approved a settlement that will remove mid-rise buildings from Holmwood Avenue, cap the heights of other buildings and provide added protection for the urban park.

The settlement, arising out of mediation with city staff, the Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group and community groups, would also cap residential development at 280 units, add some traffic restrictions, and set aside park space at Bank Street and Holmwood Avenue.

The settlement, arising out of mediation with city staff, the Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group and community groups, would also cap residential development at 280 units, add some traffic restrictions, and set aside park space at Bank Street and Holmwood Avenue.

The settlement is contingent on the Glebe Community Association and the Old Ottawa South Community Association and other groups dropping zoning appeals to the Ontario Municipal Board. All but three appeals filed by individuals remain before the Ontario Municipal Board.

City Council approves mediated settlement on Lansdowne zoning with community groups

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City of Ottawa press release

Ottawa – City Council today approved a significant mediated settlement on Lansdowne zoning with a number of community groups that marks a turning point in the City’s working relationship with its neighbourhood stakeholders and will also help to avoid an Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) hearing.

“By reaching this agreement today, we have not only signalled the start of a more productive partnership with our community stakeholders, but we have made huge strides towards avoiding a very lengthy and costly OMB hearing,” said Mayor Jim Watson. “I would like to thank the community groups, City staff and Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group, for their determination in finding a consensus. It’s a sure sign that working together we can achieve progress.”

“This settlement is the result of significant effort, goodwill and willingness amongst the City, its partner, the Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group, and community associations to work together during the recent mediation sessions,” said Kent Kirkpatrick, City Manager. “The lengthy mediation process has resulted in a consensus, compromises and some changes to the project.”