OSEG to seek tourism designation for Lansdowne

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By Jon Willing, Ottawa Sun

The Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group will submit an application to declare Lansdowne Park a tourism site, the CEO says.

"We'll be working on that as soon as possible," Bernie Ashe said Monday.

Ashe said the company is working with the Glebe BIA and hopes to have the paperwork filed at City Hall within 60 days. From there, it will be up to council to make a decision.

Declaring Lansdowne a tourist site would allow stores to be open on statutory holidays, adding to existing sites in Ottawa that include the Byward Market and Rideau St.

Whole Foods at Lansdowne received a visit from police on Good Friday when the store was open against the law. The grocer claims it thought Lansdowne already had tourism designation.

OSEG, which is the city's partner in the Lansdowne redevelopment, is the landlord for the retail stores.

Since council's meeting schedule thins out over the summer, Ashe doesn't expect a quick turnaround on a decision.

Ashe on Monday was at City Hall fielding questions from council's transportation committee about the first year of traffic and parking for major events at Lansdowne.

The committee, which includes Lansdowne-area Coun. David Chernushenko, agreed the traffic and parking problem wasn't as bad as some thought it would be.

"It gives me great pleasure to say nobody is saying, 'I told you so'," Chernushenko said.

The local community associations want the city to protect on-street parking for residents and get more people to take OC Transpo.

The Glebe BIA wants the city to consider a free fare zone on Bank St. to encourage transit use. Transpo says it's feasible but the lost revenue would need to be recouped somehow.

Orléans Coun. Bob Monette brought up concerns about transportation to the site in the winter and traffic gridlock on Bank St.

Ashe said OSEG would be open to allowing cars to park on TD Place field for events in the winter -- such as Ottawa 67s games -- since it's not being used.

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Mayor disappointed with grocer’s Good Friday snub

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By Jon Willing, Ottawa Sun

Mayor Jim Watson says he’s “disappointed” the green grocer at Lansdowne Park broke the law by opening on Good Friday.

“I was not pleased that Whole Foods decided to just snub their nose at the provincial law,” Watson said Tuesday. “If they want to have a discussion about a tourism designation for Lansdowne, there’s a proper process to follow that through.”

Watson said he would be interested in the public’s opinion if the city was to consider a tourism designation for Lansdowne Park, making it legal for stores to open on statutory holidays.

“Until we get an application we’re not going to proactively go out and start designating areas as tourism areas,” Watson said.

The Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group, the landlord for retail at Lansdowne, is considering whether or not it will apply for tourism status.

A Whole Foods spokeswoman on the weekend said the grocer thought Lansdowne had a tourism designation. The grocery store was closed on Easter Sunday.

Watson said he’s conflicted over allowing more shopping on stat holidays in Ottawa.

“It is a divisive issue. I have been living across the street from Whole Foods (in respite care recovering from a pelvic fracture) and on that day I was out hobbling along and people were going in and out of it with great numbers,” Watson said. “On the one hand there’s consumer demand that want it, but on the other hand there’s the fairness to the employees and the other businesses that didn’t open and followed the law.”

Capital Coun. David Chernushenko said any discussion about giving Lansdowne tourism status must also include the larger Glebe business area.

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City, OSEG in showdown over $17M in Civic Centre bill

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BY Jon Willing, Ottawa Sun

The city and its Lansdowne Park partner could face each other in the legal arena this year over $17 million in steel repairs at the old Civic Centre.

The Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group has paid for the renovations at the TD Place arena, even though the company has questioned if should be on the hook for the extra costs.

The deal to redevelop Lansdowne includes a dispute resolution provision requiring the two sides to talk it out before signing up for arbitration.

The city and OSEG have been talking about it for more than a year.

According to the city, both sides are getting their legal guns ready before deciding if an arbitrator should decide who pays the massive bill.

"Each party has retained legal counsel and they are preparing the case for their respective client," city solicitor and clerk Rick O'Connor said Wednesday in an e-mail to the Sun.

O'Connor said if the negotiations can't resolve the disagreement, the dispute would head to arbitration later this year or in early 2016.

Glebe to concerts: Come on down — carefully

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Tom Spears, Ottawa Citizen

The Glebe is offering a welcome, if not a noisy one, to Def Leppard and the just-renamed CityFolk festival.

Both will play at the newly renovated Lansdowne Park, it was revealed Tuesday.

Glebe residents have complained in the past about noise from the Central Canada Exhibition, especially concerts at night. This year's Folk Festival at Hog's Back Park also brought noise complaints, some from the Glebe, which is about four kilometres away.

"The idea of concerts taking place at Lansdowne has always been part of the expectation," resident Bob Brocklebank.

"Even when Lansdowne consisted mostly of asphalt, there were concerts there, too," said Brocklebank, who has just finished a term in charge of Lansdowne issues at the Glebe Community Association.

"The problem is to work out a working relationship between the community and the concert organizers so that everybody can get along," he said. That would include concert hours and noise levels.

"We don't expect to be able to hear the hummingbird's wings flapping if you live downtown. You're accustomed to the traffic and noise and air-conditioning units," he said.

Folkfest moves to Glebe, changes name to CityFolk

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By Michelle Nash, Ottawa Community News

The Ottawa Folk Festival will move and change its name for 2015.

The festival – now dubbed CityFolk – will call Lansdowne Park home as organizers make a move to a more central location for music fans.

"The fact that Lansdowne was complete and seeing the new site really inspired us with what we could do there with the festival," said Mark Monahan, the festival's executive and artistic director.

According to Monahan, both parks are similar in size, but Lansdowne offers services Hog's Back Park cannot, which he said will make setting up and operation of the festival much easier.

Lansdowne's great lawn will be the location of the gated main stage for ticket-holders-only.

The area in front of and around the Aberdeen Pavilion will be open to the public and will include craft beer tents and musical programming.

Noise from this past year's festival at Hog's Back prompted a number of complaints from the Glebe neighbourhood, as the sound trickled down the river into their neighbourhood and the festival was ultimately slapped with a $405 fine after its opening night.

To mitigate concerns for 2015, Monahan said he has already met with Capital Coun. David Chernushenko about noise concerns and plans to hold a consultation with the community in the spring.

That was welcome news to Glebe Community Association president Christine McAllister, who added the community does acknowledge events at the park will be coming.

"We will be looking at the noise and making sure that bylaws are followed, but we also know it's just part of living next to the venue," McAllister said.

McAllister said since the park opened, the community has been focused on the day-to-day impacts and as more events occur, the association's Lansdowne Park committee will address community concerns and work with the city and park operator Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group to alleviate them.

"We do plan to take a closer look at the impacts that could happen," she said.

Shaking the foundations in the Glebe

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Matthew Pearson, Ottawa Citizen

Ottawa's folk music festival is coming to Lansdowne Park.

As arts writer Lynn Saxberg reports in Tuesday's Citizen, the newly-named CityFolk will take place at the redeveloped Bank Street park from Sept. 17 to 20, 2015.

The festival has spent the past four years at the bucolic, if a bit muddy, Hog's Back Park, but organizers appear to be after a more accessible site with better electrical and water hook-ups.

Lansdowne's got that, but it's also got neighbours. Lots of them. And if the noise from the festival prompted complaints and charges last year — when the main stage was located several kilometres away — one can only imagine what will happen when the stage is closer.

Saxberg's story says organizers will be mindful of the direction the main stage faces and are thinking about presenting shows earlier in the evening, so the music will be finished by 10 p.m., instead of 11 p.m.

Capital Coun. David Chernushenko spoke out about the complaints he received after the first night of this year's festival, saying at the time that it was the organizer's responsibility to ensure the city's noise bylaws weren't being broken.

Keeping noise under control has nothing to do with stopping people from having fun, Chernushenko said then.

"It's about respect ... I'm just tired of talking to festival organizers and having them argue with me, and tell me I'm wrong, and that my residents are just a bunch of no-fun party poopers, that, really, it wasn't that bad."

Ottawa Folk Festival rebranded as Cityfolk

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By Aedan Helmer, Ottawa Sun

Urban-dwellers are going to have to learn to get along with the Cityfolk.

The city's info line was flooded with noise complaints in September -- coming primarily from Glebe residents -- when the 20th anniversary edition of the Ottawa Folk Festival took the stage four kilometres and two neighbourhoods away in Hog's Back Park.

Now, festival boss Mark Monahan is setting up shop right in their back yard, bringing the newly-rebranded Cityfolk Festival to Lansdowne Park for the 2015 edition.

"I think Lansdowne is a great site for outdoor events, and not specifically TD Place, but the entire park, with the Great Lawn, Aberdeen Pavilion, the Horticultural Building, and we've been talking with the city and looking at those spaces," said Monahan.

"And ultimately we've grown the Folk Festival to the point where staging at Hog's Back has become difficult logistically."

Monahan enjoyed some great success after taking the floundering festival under his wing and moving it to Hog's Back for four editions -- the audience and artistic budget expanding exponentially -- but the 2014 festival was marred by a war of words that erupted over a bylaw ticket issued on opening night.

But Monahan said the goal is to work with communities and residents to mitigate issues around the sound bleed.

"It's a site the city wants to promote as a cultural site, and not just sporting events, and I think this is a great anchor event," he said.

Monahan sat down with Capital Coun. David Chernushenko to smooth over any lingering ill feelings and to start ironing out the kinks.

New home, new name for Ottawa Folk Festival: Cityfolk @ Lansdowne

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Lynn Saxberg, Ottawa Citizen

The 2015 edition of the Ottawa Folk Festival will have a slick new name and an urban home to mark the start of its third decade of existence. CityFolk will take place at Lansdowne Park from Sept. 17-20.

The move to the newly revamped Bank Street landmark comes after four years of butting heads with Mother Nature at the lush, green Hog's Back Park site. Though spacious and picturesque, the National Capital Commission park was never designed for large events, noted festival director Mark Monahan in an interview.

"It really is a difficult site to manage when you have any kind of precipitation," Monahan said, recalling the muck that developed at Hog's Back when it rained. "There's no water or power or service roads. Just basic servicing of toilets and vendors is extremely difficult. It is a beautiful location but problematic in many ways for a larger event."

At the Lansdowne Park site, the CityFolk main stage will be located on the Great Lawn, the expanse of green space next to the TD Place football stadium. The festival will also make use of the Aberdeen Pavilion, the Horticulture Building and likely some of the other public spaces, but not the stadium. No big jump in attendance is expected; capacity of the new site is estimated at about 15,000 people.

Of course, moving the festival to the heart of the city may spark a flurry of noise complaints from nearby residents, especially considering the fest was charged this year after complaints during the opening-night concert by Foster the People. To deal with the issue in the new site, organizers say they will be mindful of the direction the main stage faces, and are considering the idea of presenting concerts earlier in the evening so the music is finished by 10 p.m. Monahan said he hopes to further discuss the city's noise bylaw with Capital ward Coun. David Chernushenko in the new year.

Glebe, Lansdowne Park businesses could benefit from each other

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Opening of Whole Foods Market, Sporting Life this week begins battle for customers

Sporting Life, left, and Whole Foods open on the same week, creating immediate competition for smaller businesses along Bank Street.

 Sporting Life, left, and Whole Foods open on the same week, creating immediate competition for smaller businesses along Bank Street. (Julie Ireton/CBC)

 

CBC News

At times tense and heated, the relationship between small businesses in the Glebe neighbourhood and those settling in at Lansdowne Park will be one of reciprocity, according to retail experts and local businesses.

"All families fight," said Gilbert Russell, vice-chairman of the Glebe Business Improvement Area, "Both parties have realized that we are going to be better if we work together."

Some businesses have already opened at the rebuilt Lansdowne Park.

But this week is important as key entities Whole Foods Market and Sporting Life open for the public this week — Wednesday and Thursday respectively — leading to major competition for smaller Glebe operations like McKeen’s Metro, Kunstadt Sports and others.

Retail expert Darren Fleming believes the businesses will rely on each other to bring shoppers to the area. The smaller Glebe stores have the history and the clientele, while the larger stores have the uniqueness and newness.

Also, Lansdowne is not your typical retail site, said Fleming, a managing principal at Cresa Ottawa.

"There aren’t acres and acres of parking that people can pull up to in front of the store," he said. "Whole Foods has a lot of experience in these types of developments."

If you don’t find the information you need on these pages, please visit ottawa.ca/newlansdowne, or to contact the City directly by email at newlansdowne@ottawa.caor by calling 3-1-1 (press 1 for English, then 5 for the Lansdowne line). If necessary, you may also contact the project manager, Marco Manconi, at 613-580-2424 ext. 43229, or by email.