Council casts vote in favour of longer parking hours

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Chernushenko raises concerns about how bylaw overhaul will impact Lansdowne

Jennifer McIntosh, Ottawa Community News

If you can park for six hours in Old Ottawa South, customers may not pay for spots around Lansdowne, said Capital Coun. David Chernushenko during a vote to ratify changes to the city’s parking bylaw.

Council approved the slate of changes, which most notably include moving to six hour parking on unsigned streets during the weekend and statutory holidays, on Sept. 13.

“The plans for Lansdowne never envisioned streets in Old Ottawa South where you can park for six hours,” he said. “The parking lots in the area are already underwhelmed.”

Chernushenko, who voted in favour of the changes, said he will likely work with residents to institute parking restrictions on some streets.

Enforcing 6-hour parking limit won't be easy, committee told

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Transportation committee OK's move to 6-hour limit on weekends, holidays

By Laura Osman, CBC News

The city manager in charge of parking enforcement has warned councillors on Ottawa's transportation committee that his department will have a hard time enforcing a proposed change to the length of time vehicles can occupy unmarked spots on weekends and holidays.

Currently, Ottawa's parking bylaw limits parking on most residential streets to three hours between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m., seven days a week.

The city's transportation committee voted Wednesday to extend that limit, commonly known as the "three-hour rule," on weekends and holidays to six hours.

The idea behind the change, according to Troy Leeson, manager of parking enforcement for the city, is to prevent bylaw officers from ruining birthday parties and other get-togethers in residential neighbourhoods by leaving tickets on guests' cars.

However Leeson said the extension will make it difficult to penalize offenders who stay parked beyond the new six-hour limit, because bylaw officers' shifts are only seven-and-a-half hours long.

That will make it hard for officers to both chalk tires and issue tickets during their shifts on weekends and holidays, Leeson told the committee.

"It won't be without challenge," Leeson said.

Join David Chernushenko for his final Capital Ride

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MEDIA INVITATION

Friday, September 15

Over the past few months, Councillor David Chernushenko has been beavering away at his Canada/Ottawa 150 project to tackle all 15 Capital Rides, a set of cycling routes exploring every corner of our vast city.

On Friday, September 15, he will complete his quest with the “Out a Way 100K” route west of Kanata, and is inviting members of the media to join him for the whole ride, part of the ride, or to meet him at the start or finish.

He will depart from the Richcraft Recreation Complex in Kanata (4101 Innovation Dr.) at 9:30 a.m. and expects to return around 2:30 p.m. He plans to stop for lunch at Alice’s Village Café in Carp (3773 Carp Rd.) around 1 p.m.

Because the timing could change, please call 613-580-2487 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you plan to join David at any point.

Old Ottawa South church seeking financial salvation from condo faces concerns

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Residents raise concerns about proposed condo's height, obstruction of heritage views of church


This architectural rendering shows the proposed condo and townhouses as seen from Galt Street. Southminster United Church can be seen behind them.

By Matthew Kupfer, CBC News

As Southminster United Church turns to a developer to help its finances, Old Ottawa South residents have raised objections about a proposed condominium's height and the obstruction of heritage views of the church itself.

Windmill Developments is behind the proposal, which includes four three-storey townhouses and a 14-unit, six-storey apartment building.

Church administrators made their case for looking for a development deal at an official public consultation held Monday night in the church basement at 15 Aylmer St.

Andrew Brewin, a member of the congregation in charge of the redevelopment, said the church is trying to make sure it can continue to operate as a place of worship and a community hub.

'Ultimately, it is survival'

"Ultimately, it is survival. Can our congregation pull together the resources, both financial and human, to be able to continue for the next 85-plus years?" Brewin asked.

"If we do this proposal, we will be able to do that. Otherwise, if we have to go back to the drawing board, it really is hard to see how we'll be able to draw the kind of energy that's needed to do that kind of work."

The church turned to redeveloping the site after attempts to get more money by renting church space came up short.

The church's financial shortfall happened in part because of overdue repairs to a hall that was built in 1955 and created a "drip, drip, drip" from the congregation's budget, Brewin said.

The value of the deal is "in the neighbourhood" of $2 million, he added.

Questions about height, obstructed views

Residents said they felt the church hadn't consulted enough prior to going to the developer, and that the church should have looked for alternatives to keep programs running.

Laura Urrechaga was among the 13 original members of Development Watch Southminster, a group that formed to organize people who were against Windmill's proposal.

"We as a community, want them to survive. But we want the importance of our heritage value to be maintained," Urrechaga said. "We do not want to be turned into Westboro."

Among the key issues is the height of the proposed building — six-storeys or about 19 metres — which is almost double what's allowed for neighbouring residential and commercial buildings, she said.